Fall 2016 Semester Course Schedule

To register for Museum Studies courses, please contact Program in Museum Studies, Graduate School of Arts and Science, at 212.998.8080 or by email at museum.studies@nyu.edu
(Course offering, time, and location are subject to change - updated September 6, 2016.)

MSMS-GA 1500  Section: 001 | Class#: 1391 | 4 credits
HISTORY AND THEORY OF MUSEUMS
Tuesday, 6:00--9:00 p.m.
25 West 4th Street, Room C-11
Rosanna N. Flouty

MSMS-GA 1500  Section: 002 | Class#: 1392 | 4 credits
HISTORY AND THEORY OF MUSEUMS
Thursday, 10:00 a.m.--1:00 p.m.
Silver Center, 100 Washington Square East, Room 404
Marissa H. Petrou

MSMS-GA 1501  Section: 001 | Class#: 1393 | 4 credits
MUSEUM COLLECTIONS AND EXHIBITIONS
Thursday, 6:00--9:00 p.m.
25 West 4th Street, Room C-11
Josephine Gear

MSMS-GA 1501  Section: 002 | Class#: 1394 | 4 credits
MUSEUM COLLECTIONS AND EXHIBITIONS
Friday, 11:00 a.m.--2:00 p.m.
Silver Center, 100 Washington Square East, Room 412
Josephine Gear

MSMS-GA 2221  Section: 001 | Class#: 1395 | 4 credits
DEVELOPMENT, FUND-RAISING AND GRANTSMANSHIP:
FUNDING THE 21st CENTURY MUSEUM

Wednesday, 2:00--5:00 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Helen Warwick

MSMS-GA 2224  Section: 001 | Class#: 1396 | 4 credits
MUSEUM EDUCATION
Wednesday, 6:00--9:00 p.m.
Bobst Library, 70 Washington Square South, Room LL146
William B. Crow

MSMS-GA 3330  Section: 001 | Class#: 1398 | 4 credits
TOPICS IN MUSEUM STUDIES: MUSEUMS AND COMMUNITY
Wednesday, 10:00 a.m.--1:00 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Glenn Wharton

MSMS-GA 3330  Section: 002 | Class#: 1899 | 4 credits
TOPICS IN MUSEUM STUDIES: BLOCKBUSTERS AND BUILDING BOOMS
Tuesday, 2:00--5:00 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Miriam M. Basilio

MSMS-GA 3330  Section: 003 | Class#: 1900 | 4 credits
(Cross-listed in Anthropology Department under ANTH-GA 3393.001;
cross-listed in Humanities and Social Thought under DRAP-GA 3330.003)
TOPICS IN MUSEUM STUDIES: HERITAGE, MEMORY AND NEGOTIATING TEMPORALITIES
Monday, 9:30 a.m.--12:30 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Jane E. Anderson

MSMS-GA 3335 Section: 001 | Class#: 17555 | 4 credits
(Cross-listed in Humanities and Social Thought under DRAP-GA 3335.001)
MUSEUMS AND CONTEMPORARY ART
Thursday, 2:00--5:00 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Bruce J. Altshuler

MSMS-GA 3915  Section: 001 | Class#: 1399 | 1-4 credits
RESEARCH IN MUSEUM STUDIES
Independent Study -- to be arranged individually
Bruce J. Altshuler

MSMS-GA 3990  Section: 001 | Class#: 1400 | 2 credits
INTERNSHIP
To be arranged individually with Museum Studies Internship Coordinator
Rosanna N. Flouty

MSMS-GA 3991  Section: 001 | Class#: 1401 | 2 credits
RESEARCH SEMINAR
Tuesday, 10:00 a.m.--12:30 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Glenn Wharton

MSMS-GA 3991  Section: 002 | Class#: 1402 | 2 credits
RESEARCH SEMINAR
Tuesday, 6:20-8:50 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Marissa H. Petrou



MSMS-GA 1500
Sections: 1 and 2
History and Theory of Museums

Required Course. 4 points.
Introduction to the social, cultural, and political history of museums. This course focuses on the formation of the modern museum with an emphasis on the US context. Museums of Natural History, Anthropology, Science, Technology, History, and Art will be addressed from a variety of disciplinary approaches that explore the institution and its practices with respect to governance, colonialism, nationalism, class, gender, ethnicity, and community. Weekly visits to New York museums are required, along with frequent reading response papers, an exhibition review, and a final paper.
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MSMS-GA 1500
Sections: 1 and 2
History and Theory of Museums

Required Course. 4 points.
Introduction to the social, cultural, and political history of museums. This course focuses on the formation of the modern museum with an emphasis on the US context. Museums of Natural History, Anthropology, Science, Technology, History, and Art will be addressed from a variety of disciplinary approaches that explore the institution and its practices with respect to governance, colonialism, nationalism, class, gender, ethnicity, and community. Weekly visits to New York museums are required, along with frequent reading response papers, an exhibition review, and a final paper.
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MSMS-GA 1501
Sections: 1 and 2
Museum Collections and Exhibitions.

Required Course. 4 points.
This course introduces students to the care and management of objects and collections, and to the process of organizing a temporary exhibition. Assignments consist of individual reports and working in small teams to prepare and present proposals on specific functions of collection management, and to make an exhibition proposal. Museum professionals (Registrars, Conservators, Curators) will speak on issues specific to their practice. Museum visits are scheduled as part of regular classroom meetings. As far as possible the course covers museums of all disciplines.
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MSMS-GA 1501
Sections: 1 and 2
Museum Collections and Exhibitions.

Required Course. 4 points.
This course introduces students to the care and management of objects and collections, and to the process of organizing a temporary exhibition. Assignments consist of individual reports and working in small teams to prepare and present proposals on specific functions of collection management, and to make an exhibition proposal. Museum professionals (Registrars, Conservators, Curators) will speak on issues specific to their practice. Museum visits are scheduled as part of regular classroom meetings. As far as possible the course covers museums of all disciplines.
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MSMS-GA 2221
Development, Fund-Raising, and Grantsmanship: Funding the 21st Century Museum

Elective. 4 points.
In the 21st century museums worldwide need creative fundraising to survive. This course provides a comprehensive overview of museum fundraising practices and an introduction to the skills and processes necessary for effective fundraising. Focusing in particular on the funding environment in the USA – but referencing other international models – topics covered include an overview of sources of funding and types of fundraising (capital campaign; planned giving, benefit events etc.) and a survey of procedures for identifying available funds. Invited guests from a range of museum environments will discuss examples of successful fundraising. Students will complete various examples of fundraising approach (individual solicitations and grant requests, for example) and a comprehensive fundraising strategy for a museum project of their choice.
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MSMS-GA 2224
Museum Education

Elective. 4 points.
This seminar provides an overview of the field of Museum Education. Museum Education is considered in the context of the institution's relationship with constituent communities, with application to a broad range of audiences. Among the topics to be considered are teaching from objects, learning strategies, working with docents and volunteers, program planning, and the educational use of interactive technologies.
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MSMS-GA 3330
Section: 1
Topics in Museum Studies: Museums and Community

Elective. 4 points.
There has been a turn towards community engagement in recent museum practice. Museum programming today includes civic activism, community participation, and even community organizing in its core activities. This trend manifests in all aspects of museum practice, including exhibition, education, research, and collections care. This seminar investigates the theoretical underpinnings of community engagement along with its practical outcomes. It builds an understanding of community programming in the context of critical museum theory. Collaborative student projects include a critique of existing museum programs and the design of a proposed community-based program at a museum.
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MSMS-GA 3330
Section: 2
Topics in Museum Studies: Blockbusters and Building Booms

Elective. 4 points.
Recent exhibitions including Tutankhamun and the Age of the Pharaohs at LACMA have revived ongoing discussions about the motivations that lead museums to program blockbusters and their effects on museum practices. Although financial pressures are often cited as a cause for such large, well-attended exhibitions, scholarly motivations should not be disregarded. Many museums in the US have recently undertaken building projects, which may be examined as part of broader initiatives - such as re-branding and audience development - that have also been linked to the blockbuster phenomenon. Historical and contemporary cases of the blockbuster, and recent instances of museum building projects will be examined in the course, in light of these museums' missions.
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MSMS-GA 3330
Section: 3
Topics in Museum Studies: Heritage, Memory and Negotiating Temporalities

Elective. 4 points
What is heritage, how is it produced and to what extent does it (re)arrange relationships between time, memory and identity? How do some heritages come to be memorialized and institutionalized and others excluded and rendered peripheral? This seminar will cover the historical development of the concept of heritage as well as exploring the genesis of international heritage administration, charters, conventions, and national heritage laws. It will highlight emerging trends and practices including exploring the concept of "social memory" and contrast it with the more formalized techniques of heritage didactics and curation. We will explore the increasing interest in "bottom-up" heritage programming that directly involves the general public in the formulation, collection, and public presentation of historical themes and subjects as an ongoing social activity. Case studies from different regions and social contexts will be explored: "conflicted heritage," "minority heritage," "indigenous heritage," "diasporic heritage," "sites of conscience," long-term community planning and involvement in "eco-museums," the relationship between heritage, development and tourism and public heritage interpretation centers. Students will be asked to address specific problems in sites or organizations presented during the course and will formulate socio-interpretive assessments of projects or research of their choosing in the U.S. or abroad.
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MSMS-GA 3335
Section: 1
Museums and Contemporary Art

Elective. 4 points
This course investigates historical, theoretical, and practical aspects of the collecting and exhibiting of contemporary art in museums. Topics include curatorial strategies for exhibition and collection development, biennialism, the art market, conservation issues, artworks that take the museum as subject, public and relational art, and conflicts of interest that arise for museum staff and trustees. A familiarity with international contemporary art is required. Assignments include two short essays, class presentations, and a final paper.
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MSMS-GA 3915
Research in Museum Studies

Elective. 1-4 points.
Independent research on a topic determined in consultation with the program director.
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MSMS-GA 3990
Internship

Required Course. 2 points.
(Open to the Museum Studies students only)
M.A. and Advanced Certificate students spend a minimum of 300 hours over one or more semesters in a project-oriented internship at a museum or other suitable institution. Students nearing completion of course prerequisites (MSMS-GA 1500, MSMS-GA 1501, and MSMS-GA 1502) must schedule a planning meeting with the Program's Internship Coordinator. A daily log, evaluations, and progress report are required. Students must earn a grade of B or better to receive the M.A. or Advanced Certificate. Further information is available in the Internship Guidelines Packet.
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MSMS-GA 3991
Section: 1 and 2
Research Seminar

Required Course. 2 points.
(Open to the Museum Studies students only)
Students conduct research combining their academic and professional interests, using appropriate methodology. They formulate a topic, prepare an annotated bibliography, and write a qualifying paper based on their research. M.A. students also develop their thesis proposal.
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MSMS-GA 3991
Section: 1 and 2
Research Seminar

Required Course. 2 points.
(Open to the Museum Studies students only)
Students conduct research combining their academic and professional interests, using appropriate methodology. They formulate a topic, prepare an annotated bibliography, and write a qualifying paper based on their research. M.A. students also develop their thesis proposal.
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