Spring 2017 Semester Course Schedule

To register for Museum Studies courses, please contact Program in Museum Studies, Graduate School of Arts and Science, at 212.998.8080 or by email at museum.studies@nyu.edu
(Course offering, time, and location are subject to change - updated January 12, 2017)

MSMS-GA 1502  Section: 001 | Class#: 2493 | 4 credits
MUSEUM MANAGEMENT
Monday, 5:15-8:15 p.m.
Waverly Building, 24 Waverly Place, Room 370
Ruth Cohen

MSMS-GA 1502  Section: 002 | Class#: 2494 | 4 credits
MUSEUM MANAGEMENT
Monday, 5:15-8:15 p.m.
GCASL, 238 Thompson Street, Room 383
Helen Warwick

MSMS-GA 2222  Section: 001 | Class #: 3027 | 4 credits
CONSERVATION AND COLLECTIONS MANAGEMENT
Tuesday, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Glenn Wharton

MSMS-GA 2223  Section: 001 | Class#: 2495 | 4 credits
(Cross-listed in History Department, GSAS, as HIST-GA.1002.003)
HISTORIC SITES, CULTURAL LANDSCAPES AND THE POLITICS OF PRESERVATION
Monday, 2:00-5:00 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Marissa Petrou

MSMS-GA 2225  Section: 001 | Class#: 20665 | 4 credits
MUSEUMS AND INTERACTIVE TECHNOLOGIES
Wednesday, 2:00-5:00 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Rosanna Flouty

MSMS-GA 3330  Section: 001 | Class#: 2496 | 4 credits
(Cross-listed in NYU Law School as LAW-LW.12121.001)
TOPICS IN MUSEUM STUDIES: MUSEUMS AND THE LAW
Wednesday, 6:00-9:00 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Hima B. Gleason

MSMS-GA 3330  Section: 002 | Class#: 2497 | 4 credits
TOPICS IN MUSEUM STUDIES: NEW YORK'S SMALL MUSEUMS
Tuesday, 2:00-5:00 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Bruce J. Altshuler

MSMS-GA 3330  Section: 003 | Class#: 2498 | 4 credits
(Cross-listed in NYU Institute of Fine Arts as FINH-GA 3042.001)
TOPICS IN MUSEUM STUDIES: COLLECTIONS AND EXHIBITIONS
OF LATIN AMERICAN ART, 1900-PRESENT

Tuesday, 3:00-5:00 p.m.
IFA, 1 East 78th Street, Seminar Room 119
Miriam Basilio & Edward Sullivan

MSMS-GA 3330  Section: 004 | Class#: 2499 | 4 credits
(Cross-listed in Draper Program, GSAS, as DRAP-GA 3330.004)
TOPICS IN MUSEUM STUDIES: MUSEUMS AND POLITICAL CONFLICT
Thursday, 6:00-9:00 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Jeffrey D. Feldman

MSMS-GA 3330  Section: 005 | Class#: 2500 | 4 credits
(Cross-listed in Draper Program, GSAS, as DRAP-GA 3330.005)
TOPICS IN MUSEUM STUDIES: ANTHROPOLOGY OF MUSEUMS
Monday, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Jane Anderson

MSMS-GA 3330  Section: 006 | Class#: 3286 | 4 credits
(Cross-listed in Draper Program, GSAS, as DRAP-GA 3330.006
and in NYU Institute of Fine Arts as FINH-GA.3042.002)
TOPICS IN MUSEUM STUDIES: MUSEUM LIFE OF CONTEMPORARY ART
Wednesday, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Glenn Wharton

MSMS-GA 3332  Section: 001 | Class#: 2501 | 4 credits
EXHIBITION PLANNING AND DESIGN
Thursday, 2:00-5:00 p.m.
240 Greene Street, Room 410
Ileen S. Gallagher

MSMS-GA 3915  Section: 001 | Class#: 2502 | 1-4 credits
RESEARCH IN MUSEUM STUDIES
Independent Study -- to be arranged individually
Bruce J. Altshuler

MSMS-GA 3990 Section: 001 | Class#: 2503 | 2 credits
INTERNSHIP
To be arranged individually with Museum Studies Internship Coordinator
Rosanna Flouty


MSMS-GA 1502
Sections: 1 and 2
Museum Management

Required Course. 4 points.
This course provides an overview of management, finance, and administration for those aspiring to managerial and supervisory positions in museums. Topics to be covered include mission; leadership and strategic planning; governance and institutional policy; organizational structure and the roles and relationships of museum departments; operational issues, including security and disaster planning; museum finance, including operating and capital expense budgeting; fundraising; and marketing and branding. Case studies taken from New York City museums will be analyzed, and all topics will be placed in the context of how museum staff best deliver programs, and serve their public communities most effectively.
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MSMS-GA 1502
Sections: 1 and 2
Museum Management

Required Course. 4 points.
This course provides an overview of management, finance, and administration for those aspiring to managerial and supervisory positions in museums. Topics to be covered include mission; leadership and strategic planning; governance and institutional policy; organizational structure and the roles and relationships of museum departments; operational issues, including security and disaster planning; museum finance, including operating and capital expense budgeting; fundraising; and marketing and branding. Case studies taken from New York City museums will be analyzed, and all topics will be placed in the context of how museum staff best deliver programs, and serve their public communities most effectively.
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MSMS-GA 2222
Conservation and Collections Management

Elective. 4 points.
This seminar combines classroom discussion with museum visits to provide an understanding of preventive care, collections conservation, and collections management. It covers the historical and philosophical drive to preserve cultural objects for the future, and value conflicts that arise between professionals and non-professionals with stakes in how material culture is exhibited. The seminar addresses concerns of living artists as well as indigenous groups and others with claims to the disposition and care of cultural materials. It also covers collections management policies and procedures, including environmental management, disaster management, and collections documentation. Students perform condition assessments and conduct research leading to short writing assignments and a term paper.          
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MSMS-GA 2223
Historic Sites, Cultural Landscapes and the Politics of Preservation

Elective. 4 points.
This course will examine the cultural politics that influence reuse of historic spaces for museums and other public purposes. Through course readings, site visits and individual archival research, students will explore sites ranging from historic houses and period rooms presented as museum installations to restored villages and communities to dramatic reuse of historic space for cultural tourism. Students will pay particular attention to the social and political contexts in which original use and subsequent reuse took place, and analyze primary documents that illustrate both motivations and strategies for interpretation.
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MSMS-GA 2225
Museums and Interactive Technologies

Elective. 4 points.
This course will present a survey and analysis of museum use of interactive technologies. Among the topics to be discussed in detail are strategies and tools for collections management, exhibitions, educational resources and programs, website design, digitization projects, and legal issues arising from the use of these technologies. Each student will develop an interactive project in an area of special interest.
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MSMS-GA 3330
Section: 1
Topics in Museum Studies: Museums and the Law

Elective. 4 points.
Legal issues pervade so many aspects of the world of museums. The law can both constrain and enable the behavior of museum staff, administration, and others who work with these cultural organizations. Therefore, it is difficult to work in, for and with museums without some training in or familiarity with the law. In this course, we will examine how museums are affected by a variety of legal regulations, including cultural heritage legislation, intellectual property issues, such as copyright, trademark and moral rights, first amendment and censorship claims, work-place hazards, contracts, and nonprofit and tax laws, such as valuation, charitable transfers, payments in lieu of taxes and the unrelated business income tax. Readings will consist of case law and secondary sources detailing the most pressing legal issues facing different types of museums, and group discussions will be supplemented by mock case studies and negotiation exercises.
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MSMS-GA 3330
Section: 2
Topics in Museum Studies: New York's Small Museums

Elective. 4 points.
This class will study the histories, conceptual framing, exhibitions and programs of a range of smaller museums in New York City. Among the museum types we will look at are single artist museums, museums of municipal departments, for-profit museums, collector museums, historic site museums, identity-based museums, eccentric museums, and special interest museums. Many class sessions will be held at these museums. Students will write two short papers, make a presentation, and submit a final paper or project. The class also will serve as a workshop for developing possible collaborative projects between local museums and Museum Studies students.
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MSMS-GA 3330
Section: 3
Topics in Museum Studies: Collections and Exhibitions of Latin American Art, 1900-Present

Elective. 4 points.
The history of collecting and exhibiting Latin American art is still at a beginning stage. This seminar will examine significant public, private and corporate collections as well as major exhibitions in both the U.S. and Europe as a way to gauge the shifts of taste, market value, public awareness and the role of Latin American art within the ever-expanding and re-configuring canon. Questions of reception of Latin American art outside of the region itself will be a principal subject throughout the course.
Readings will include theoretical studies on collecting and curating, histories of individual movements within the development of criticism and analysis of Latin American art from c. 1950 onward, and essays on its collecting and display. For their research projects students will choose a major collection or exhibition from the past or present and examine its historical and critical significance.
Students must have the permission of the professors before registering for this course.
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MSMS-GA 3330
Section: 4
Topics in Museum Studies: Museums and Political Conflict

Elective. 4 points.
In contemporary Museum Studies, it is often said that museums are inherently political institutions. But how do politics actually happen in museums? What has "politics" meant for key exhibitions and collections and what avenues of political theory emerge from the museum in general? In this seminar, we will move beyond the general to examine how specific political concepts took shape in historic exhibitions and museum practices from the 1930s to the present. As such, our challenge will be twofold. On the one hand, we will consider how political movements have used the museums as an implement for advancing power and influence. On the other hand, we will consider how museum practices have "taken up" various kinds of politics: how museum objects and officials have engaged and advocated the agendas and outcomes of political parties, governments, policies, revolutions, and elections. Case studies will include: Degenerate Art (1937), Paris World Exhibition (1937), Rivera's "Man at the Crossroads" (1934), The Guggenheim Museum (1959), Yad Vashem (1965), Harlem on my Mind (1969), The Perfect Moment (1990), The Last Act (1994), The Jewish Museum of Bologna (1998), Sensation (1999), The Apartheid Museum (2001), Holocaust Cartoons (2006), among others. Through these case studies, students will examine the museum's role in the public sphere and the process whereby exhibitions contribute to-- or undermined--key aspects of deliberative democracy.
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MSMS-GA 3330
Section: 5
Topics in Museum Studies: Anthropology of Museums

Elective. 4 points.
This course considers "the museum" as an object of ethnographic inquiry, examining it as a social institution embedded in a broader field of cultural heritage that is perpetually under negotiation. We reflect on how museum principles of classification, practices of collection and exhibition, uptake of media, technology, and archiving have influenced the ways in which knowledge has been formed, presented, and represented; and interrogate the role of museums as significant social actors in broad anthropological debates on power, materiality, value, representation, culture, nationalism, circulation, aesthetics, science, history, and "new" technologies. The museum is never simply a repository of arts, cultures, histories, or scientific knowledges, but also a site of tremendous creativity and a field of complex social relations.
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MSMS-GA 3330
Section: 6
Topics in Museum Studies: The Museum Life of Contemporary Art

Elective. 4 points.
The topic of this seminar is the life of contemporary artworks withing museums. Sessions are organized around the trajectory of complex artworks of acquisition, to documentation, storage, exhibition, and conservation intervention. Installation, media, and performance works serve as case studies to analyze social, legal, and material dynamics as they move through this life cycle. Examination of these stages engages various contemporary debates around artist rights, artist intentions, authorship, and authenticity. Student learn about museum processes as they assess practical challenges and theoretical questions posed by contemporary art in the museum.
Students engage in project-based research to conduct artist interviews and/or investigate curatorial and conservation problems in artist archives. One group will research questions about the work of David Wojnarowicz, who was active in downtown New York during the 1970s and 1980s. His archive in the Fales Library & Special Collections will serve as a resource for the research. Other groups will conduct interviews with artists and museum staff concerning problematic artworks in local museums.
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MSMS-GA 3332
Exhibition Planning and Design

Elective. 4 points.
This course focuses on the planning, development and design of exhibitions, permanent, temporary and traveling. It is a participatory class where students learn basic exhibition design techniques, including spatial layouts and the use of graphics, audio-visual aids, lighting, colors, materials, and fabrication methods. Students gain insight into exhibition planning and development and the roles played by various museum professionals. There are visits to designers to discuss their work and to museums and other venues to analyze exhibition design techniques. Individual student projects provide hands-on experience.
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MSMS-GA 3915
Research in Museum Studies

Elective. 1-4 points.
Independent research on a topic determined in consultation with the program director.
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MSMS-GA 3990
Internship

Required Course. 2 points.
(Open to the Museum Studies students only)
M.A. and Advanced Certificate students spend a minimum of 300 hours over one or more semesters in a project-oriented internship at a museum or other suitable institution. Students nearing completion of course prerequisites (MSMS-GA 1500, MSMS-GA 1501, and MSMS-GA 1502) must schedule a planning meeting with the Program's Internship Coordinator. A daily log, evaluations, and progress report are required. Students must earn a grade of B or better to receive the M.A. or Advanced Certificate. Further information is available in the Internship Guidelines Packet.
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